Slaughtered

Just a couple of weeks ago, this story zoomed to the front of every world newspaper, every television and radio news broadcast:

“At least one gunman killed 49 people and wounded more than 40 during Friday prayers at two New Zealand mosques in the country’s worst ever mass shooting, which Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern condemned as terrorism. A gunman broadcast live stream footage on Facebook of the attack on one mosque in the city of Christchurch, mirroring the carnage played out in video games, after publishing a ‘manifesto’ in which he denounced immigrants, calling them ‘invaders.’

New Zealand was placed on its highest security threat level, Ardern said, adding that ‘this can now only be described as a terrorist attack.'”

The Christchurch attack in which a radical Australian stormed an Islamic mosque to commit the tragic murders of 50 New Zealanders was horrific. Any murder of any human at any time is tragic. Religious murders are the most egregious, for the simple fact that hatred drives someone to take another’s life in the name of religion.

In this world in which “Islamaphobia” has become an everyday word in politics, anytime there is a killing of Muslims that act immediately jumps to the front page of every newspaper, every news story, and the attack and attacker(s) is immediately damned for the atrocity. But does the World rush to judgment in the same fashion with the same vigor when the lives of Christians are taken at the hands of Muslims? “That seldom happens,” you may say. “Muslim murders of Christians hardly ever happens. That’s why we don’t hear much about that.” If you feel that way, you are dead wrong.

Would you be shocked to know that in just the first 3 months of 2019, there were 437 Islamic attacks in 35 countries, in which 2428 people were killed and 2307 injured? These were Christians killed by Muslims!

Don’t believe me? At the end of today’s story, I’ll give you a source to which you can turn 365 days of the year and see the details of every killing of Christians on Earth at the hands of Muslims: location, number killed, number injured, and the cause of each murder. The number is updated daily and goes all the way back to 9/11/2001.

It’s staggering. But it’s nothing new. As long as time has existed, there have been religious killings. No religion is exempt. Each has responsibilities for its atrocities. And each has stories of murderous atrocities that have been exacted upon its own members and members of other religions. Christians are by far NOT exempt from perpetrating killings in the name of Christianity. And, of course, millions of Christians through centuries have been killed. It’s time we all take a moment and pause in considering religious killings.

“Popular” Religious Killings

Hardly any international news agency reported that Fulani jihadists racked up a death toll of over 120 Christians over the past month or so in central Nigeria, employing machetes and gunfire to slaughter men, women, and children, burning down over 140 houses, destroying property, and spreading terror. Not one of the leading news outlets in the U.S. carried the story: Not the New York Times, Washington Post, CNN, ABC, CBS, NBC, or any other outlet. Breitbart News was the only American source for the story. There are several possible explanations for this remarkable silence, and none of them is good. Since, in point of fact, Muslim radicals kill Christians around the world with alarming frequency, it is probable that one more slaughter did not seem particularly newsworthy to the decision-makers at major news outlets.

Muslims being killed, on the other hand, may strike many as newsworthy precisely because it is so rare. A second motive for the media silence around the massacre of Christians in Nigeria may be geopolitical and racial. New Zealand is a first-world country where such things are not supposed to happen, whereas many people still consider Africa to be a backward place where brutal killings are par for the course.

The slaughter of black Christians in Africa may not spark outrage among westerners the way that the murder of white and brown Muslims in New Zealand would. But obviously the story simply does not play to the political agenda that many mainstream media would like to advance. How much mileage can be gained from Muslims murdering Christians, when Christians in America are often seen as an obstacle to the “progress” desired by liberals? The left sees Christians in the United States as part of the problem and seeks to undermine their credibility and influence at every turn rather than emboldening them.

Shortly after news broke of the horrific Christchurch mosque attack in New Zealand, radical Democrat Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez used the mass shooting as an opportunity to push an anti-gun agenda in America.  Anti-Christian bias has been rightly called “the last acceptable prejudice,” one that few bother condemning.

“No one much cares about offending Christians,” wrote a coalition of African-American pastors. “In fact, mocking, belittling, and blaspheming Christianity is becoming a bit of a trend in our culture. Anti-Christian bigotry truly is the last acceptable prejudice.” “The hypocrisy on display is astounding,” the pastors continued. “Christianity is the dominant religion of our country Nigeria. It is the foundation of our government and morality. And yet, Christians are treated as fair game for mockery and insult.”

Christians are by far the most persecuted religious group in the world, but the mainstream media routinely ignore this fact as if it were unimportant or uninteresting. As a result, many people do not even realize how widespread the persecution is or that 75 percent of the victims of religious persecution around the world are Christians. Whatever the reason — or reasons — for the media silence surrounding the most recent massacres of Christians in Nigeria as well as numerous other such events, it should give right-thinking people pause. By all means, the lethal shootings of dozens of Muslims in New Zealand is a massive story and merits extensive coverage. But it only stands to reason that similar coverage should be devoted to the slaughter of Christians. For the moment, it serves as a poignant reminder that a double standard is at work when it comes to news coverage and that it is Christians who inevitably draw the short straw.

Christianity Gets No Free-Pass

How many movies have been filmed, books written, heroes and heroine created in and around the Crusades? But many do not even know that the Crusades were a religious invasion of the Middle East and slaughter of innumerable numbers of Muslims at the hands of Christians from what is now the United Kingdom and from other European nations. It’s amazing that we Christians are no different from any other religious group when it comes to justification for our wrongdoing. Every Christian knows that Christ came as a love gift from God to the entire world. That includes people from every country, every religion, every race, no matter who is flawed by anyone’s definition.

How do we get this one thing so messed up: “God Is Love?” And then there’s John 3:16: “For God so loved the World that He gave His only Son that whoever believes on Him will not perish but have life eternal.” There is NO religious or denominational qualifier in either, is there?

For Christians, violence in the name of God has forced us to re-examine our religious convictions and to self-criticise. Ultimately this will be needed in the Muslim world too. Any effort to force this from the outside will fail.

Islam vs. Christianity

Any comparison between the two religions is full of objective difficulty. However, the Bible has distinct advantages over the Koran when it comes to re-interpreting it in a way that critiques its violence rather than normalizes it for Christians today.

“Mohammad stressed that he did not work miracles like Moses,” says one theologian. “He seemed to emphasise that miracles only harden the heart. He didn’t appeal to anything beyond his own experience. So the ultimate proof that God was on his side was victory in battle.”

The Bible, on the other hand, starts and ends with ‘shalom’, and the violence in between is less than ideal. Furthermore, while there are warrior-figures like Elijah and Moses, the example of Christ is the loudest and final voice. Muslims have Mohammad, and that’s a very different final voice.

Are there lessons from history for Islamic State? Yes. Puritans were continually looking at the world and seeing confirmation that God was on their side. Above all, their proof was victory in battle. Only after the Cromwellian regime falls apart do they re-interpret Providence: ‘We only lost because of our sin.’

Many believe that in Africa and the Middle East, if sheer pragmatism doesn’t force them to compromise, terrorist regimes will continue until these groups disintegrate or until they suffer a catastrophic defeat, like the Puritans.

But in the here and now, those same folks are anxious to emphasise the need for self-criticism: our faith has led Christians to commit violence in the past, and a polarization between people of different faiths today can have the same effect.

We need to be careful about the demonization of Muslims. Our foreign policy begins around the dinner table, with the stories we tell our friends and families about Muslims. Most of us, after all, will never encounter Muslims in the East – but we’re very likely to encounter them walking down the street.

So, does religion cause violence? The answer is that it can, and it does – but it’s up to believers to make sure that it doesn’t.

Summary

Make no mistake about this: there are dramatic differences between Christian and Muslim theology. Through the last several decades, I’ve heard plenty of attempts to explain that Muslims and Christians worship the same God: He just has a different name in Islam. However, Christians should not fall for that explanation. The God of Christianity has one Son: Jesus Christ. And the Bible makes it abundantly clear in many passages in both the Old and New Testaments, God has many names, one of which is NOT “Allah.” And God is a jealous God who abhors murder, (“Thou shalt not kill” is one of Ten Commandments) and teaches us to each “love others as we love ourselves.” He also instructed us to “Do unto others as we want them to do unto us.” I doubt that any of us want to be murdered!

In understanding in some small way why there have been so many killings of innocents around the world at the hands of Muslims, the only explanation I can reasonably settle on his “hatred.” No, I cannot see or read the hearts of any other people. But human nature dictates that all of us at some point in our life will act out what we deeply feel inside. Psychiatrists teach that holding feelings in will always result in some “boiling over” of those withheld emotions at some point, often with desperate results.

Hatred for others has had horrific results throughout history. We cal all point to the evidence of cultural as well as political hatred through centuries that have resulted in the senseless slaughter of millions of people — some even by Christians.

The one common objective of all who hope to end the religious killings of every kind from our planet is simply this: love our neighbors as we love ourselves. It’s a dramatic and maybe impossible hope that somehow we can rid the world of hatred. “We” cannot do that. But one thing I DO know is certain: the God of Christianity encourages love for all people by all of His followers. He abhors the abuse of individuals by anyone and especially taking the life of another.

That same God gave all mankind a spiritual choice. No, speaking about that is NOT politically correct today. But it certainly is appropriate in the wake of the most recent murders that occurred in New Zealand and in Nigeria in the name of God and also of Allah. But just because someone tries to relegate something so personal and non-political nothing more than a political talking point is ludicrous. My God REALLY cares for every person whose life was snuffed by another. Taking of those lives was more than just tragic. Taking those lives changed human history.

It’s time for Christians in America to realize human nature as it is played out on Earth is seldom OK. It’s almost always driven by personal desires, emotions, hatred, or love and an understanding of others’ differences or their rejection. That’s what Jesus came to Earth to end: the penalty for the acts we allow our human nature to guide us into that oppose God’s plan for every human.

It’s a choice. 3000 Americans died at the hands of a handful of Muslims on 9/11. Innumerable Muslims were slaughtered in the name of Christianity at the direction of a Pople during the Crusades. Both were driven by human nature and its hatred. Both were wrong.

Can we ever get around that human nature? Of course my hope is that we can and that we will. To do so will require a massive undertaking of self-accountability. Will we take such necessary steps? Sadly, we never have. It’s too easy to simply point fingers and place blame. Unless we can en masse turn away from that, I doubt we will ever turn that page in human history.

But we need to try — and try again.

 

Here is the link to get the day-by-day official tally of deaths at the hands of Muslims going all the way back to September 11, 2001:

https://www.thereligionofpeace.com/attacks/attacks.aspx?Yr=2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.thereligionofpeace.com/attacks/attacks.aspx?Yr=2019

“-ist” Word

How often during the last decade have you heard the use of the term “racist?” How often have YOU used the term “racist?” Have you spent any time considering its meaning and purposes for its use? Like it or not, agree with it or not, accept it or not, that term actually defines the parameters for the state of dispute and chaos in which the United States of America finds itself.

Some will argue that our 20th-century parents and grandparents did not spend much time thinking about or discussing race, equality and inequality, the social and political structure of racial divide in America, or what things should or should not be done to change political policy regarding racial issues. From time to time social and political events that popped up forced Americans to think through racial issues — mostly to simply try to find understanding for their varied ways racial issues showed themselves in public. Otherwise, it seemed that the “handling” of those were more often than not done at home, in a closed-door meeting with the boss, or — under extreme circumstances — on the street. Unfortunately, those “street” confrontations received most of the attention.

Do not for a moment think this story is in any way to diminish the existence of or the necessity to deal with any and all issues in our nation dealing with race that are daily escalating with little or no real resolution on the horizon. Americans MUST tackle these problems. But just like addressing other problems in our personal, business, or social lives, we must first define a problem before possible resolutions can be identified, discussed, with ultimate resolution.

How Do We Do That?

In 1980, candidate Reagan asked the American people a question that is now iconic political history. “Are you better off now than you were four years ago?” He knew the answer, and he knew that the overwhelming majority of Americans had an opinion about the right answer. Politicians of all stripes have tried repeatedly to re-create that stark, black and white choice. As is often the case, the power of an original line is lost when the moment in time is no longer right for the message. The message is again right.

America has a problem with race relations. It’s a human problem flamed by profiteers who gain from division either politically or economically — or both. It is not simply an American problem. Make no mistake, however, in a country where we once held blacks as property, placed them in chains, and subjugated them under the law, the stain of racism is on our soul and is still part of our modern culture. We are not born racists: we teach racism and pass it on or down.

Do we want to fix racism in this country? You bet. The overwhelming majority of Americans want it gone, and our government and numerous groups have fought from broadly different perspectives to combat it. The fight has ebbed and flowed, and we have found some success and some complete failures. Indeed, we cannot even agree on what racism is let alone how to wipe it from our culture.

On this we must agree; race relations in America are worse now than they were eight years ago. This is not to say that President Obama was the “cause” of poor race relations or that President Trump is the “cause” of poor race relations. It is to say that Obama’s prescriptions for combating racial injustice did not help, and his leadership on the issue served to fan the flames of racial mistrust. I promise you that was not his intention as some folks truly believe. Mr. Obama grew up black in America. His view was profoundly different from that of those who did not, and as President, he had a passion to expose racism and problems he had seen, fought, and perceived for decades. His had been a life of racial grievance, fighting “the man.” Then he was elected and became “the man.” His fight became all about exposing the world as he saw it. Was he wrong for that? We judge intelligent sounding public policy based on outcomes, not intentions. Mr. Obama made race relations worse, even if he was only wrong for all the right reasons.

Racism is real in America … and recently Newt Gingrich discussing escalating racial issues during the Trump Administration told white Americans that they could never really know what it was like to grow up black in America. He is right … dead right. Likewise, for many minorities, they don’t know what it is like to grow up white in America. Whiteness is not a ticket to success, nor is it a path paved by privilege. Every individual in this country has hurdles, and the absence of color surely removes one hurdle for non-minorities. Racism in America is worse not because white people are becoming more and more racist. Racism in America is getting worse because we are counting and dividing by race. We are promoting and hiring based on race. We are suing and being sued based on race. We are admitting and denying based on race — even that bastion of racial equality among Ivy League universities — Harvard. We are selling and buying distrust from our leaders, even in some churches, and family members based on race. With that distrust, we are accepting the false narrative that all whites are racists, that they have unchecked privilege, and that they seek to oppress, deny, and punish blacks for being black. Whites look at staggering black crime rates, gun violence, and anti-white militancy and they too fall prey to the false narrative that blacks pose a higher risk of being a threat just because they are black. Who can stop it? Not this old white guy.

All of this happens when the emphasis of our leaders and our public policy is on our color, rather than the content of our character or the measure of our accomplishments. We cannot and we will not succeed in a war on racism until we stop making and selling assumptions based on race – no matter our race. The best way to attack this problem is to move to a race-neutral society, where the government does not divide us by race. It is hard to build a United States in a country where we divide each other socially, academically, or legally based on color. We cannot be a United States when we demonize each other, attack the necessary fundamentals of civil society, and assume and sell the concept that law enforcement and the justice system are designed to oppress people of color. They are not.

Yes, racism exists in America. However, in a country where the last President was black, and Virginia, Ohio, and California are states he overwhelmingly won, we know that “color” is thankfully not the sole measure of a man by reasonable, responsible people. What we need now is to have more reasonable, responsible, color neutral people, governments, and organizations. Here is what is true: If you dislike or distrust someone because of the color of his or her skin — no matter what color their skin is — you may have a propensity to be racist, irrespective of the color of your skin.

The success of America is based on a simple formula that works across any color boundary. Get an education. Get, and stay, married. Raise your kids in a loving family to respect people, irrespective of color or faith. Promote education, and encourage civic activism and volunteerism in your local community. When we do those things, we will change our society. If, however, we continue down a path of broken families, broken communities, race-baiting, racial profiteering, and distrust there will be no United in our states. The answer is black and white, but it starts one household at a time, black and white.

How Can We Start That Change?

Academy Award recipient Denzel Washington chimed in on that topic the topic of racism and what Americans must do to tackle it.

Denzel is speaking to a reporter who asked Denzel how he thinks race relationships are in America. Denzel responded: “Race relationships have to do with race relationships. You’re white, or whatever you are, and I’m black, or whatever I am, and we’re standing here talking now. That’s how we get things done. You can’t legislate love. The President of the United States cannot legislate us into liking each other. We have to step forward and ask questions about each other and engage. There’s no law that says because I’m President you all gotta get along now. So it’s up to us.”

It sounds fairly simple and seems pretty easy for the Oscar winner Denzel Washington to reach out to the “other side” to open lines of communication to discuss all things pertaining to race. It’s another thing for everyday folks who live in Middle America to get started in that process — especially when every day it becomes more and more obvious to Americans that the nation seems to daily grow more and more racially divided.

A recent poll finds most Americans believe race relations in this country are bad. More than half of whites think so, and more than two-thirds of blacks. Even more troubling, 40 percent of blacks and whites believe race relations are getting worse. One possible reason: The poll found big majorities — 60 percent of whites and 71 percent of blacks — believe most Americans are uncomfortable discussing race with someone of another race.

But one group is helping blacks and whites break down the racial wall by breaking bread together. It starts out like any dinner party. But then, a difficult conversation begins. “Blacks don’t trust white people by and large,” said Linda, a black woman. “And whether you think it’s based on history is irrelevant.”

“I didn’t have black friends,” Curtis, a white man, said. “A couple of acquaintances, but never had them in our home, never in their home.”

They call themselves Chattanooga Connected: A group of blacks and whites who meet once a month to have dinner and talk openly about race. They were brought together by 75-year-old Franklin McCallie, a son of privilege whose family name is seen everywhere in town. He said he was raised to believe in the South’s segregationist order.

“I’ve used the N-word and I told some N-jokes,” McCallie says. “They were ‘less.’ They lived in less homes, they got off the street, they said ‘sir’ to me as a young man.” But in college, a conversation with a black student from a nearby African-American school changed everything. “He said, ‘You know where we eat lunch? My uncles and I, who fought in World War II for freedom and justice and the pursuit of happiness?'” McCallie recalls, becoming emotional. “‘We get on a bus and ride two miles out of town to eat lunch ’cause none of the stores we shop in will let us eat.'”

Curtis Baggett said the conversations around the dinner table can get uncomfortable – but that that’s a good thing. “I think it’s liberating,” Baggett says. “It was so freeing for the first time in my life to have a black man tell me what it really felt like to be walking around a grocery store, a mini-mart, and have the owner of the mini-mart follow him up and down the aisles because he didn’t trust him. I’ve never thought of that before.”

McCallie acknowledges that the dinner parties aren’t likely to end racism in America – but they’re a start. “If it all stops at this house, it wouldn’t do that much more,” McCallie says. “It’s got to go other places.” People finally seeing each other, by talking face-to-face.

Summary

One thing is very obvious: people of different races and different color have varying differences, come from varying circumstances, and therefore have varying perspectives. I as a Christan feel strongly that as hard as it may be, it is more important than hard for us to find ways to open discourse with each other. The Chattanooga Connected example of doing so may seem simple, and even silly to you, but it illustrates one very important element in any racial reconciliation process that MUST exist: honest effort to communicate with the “other” side to honestly find similarities, differences, and develop sincere plans and even a timeline to push for common goals and objectives.

In one of the best racial movies of all time — A Time to Kill — Carl Lee in his jail cell after shooting two men who raped his little girl has a brief discussion with Jake, his attorney:

Until ALL of America gets to a place of realization that for ANY American racial reconciliation, we MUST learn how to — and commit to — begin honest dialogue with each other to define differences and similarities between us and unite to implement necessary changes to eliminate the fires of racism.

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The Pictures of War “IN” America

War Is Here! And it’s not just in Syria and Iraq. It is alive and thriving in the United States.

On June 30th, 2018, Joey Gibson led  Patriot Prayer through the streets of Portland Oregon on their “Freedom And Courage” march. See for yourself: (what you see in the video posted on our blog page are masked Antifa terrorists stalking and attacking peaceful protestors. They beat protestors up, knocking several to the ground and are spraying pepper spray at will)

It is hard to believe that what we see in videos almost daily is actually a war of the worst kind. It’s a war of the “worst kind” because it’s here on American shores and between Americans.

War is not new to the world. It certainly is not new to the United States. But it has been more than a century since a war that involved America and Americans actually took place on American soil. The Civil War from 1861 to 1865 was the last war to invade our borders. In that one, 600,000 Americans gave their lives fighting about slavery. It changed our nation forever — not just in putting the injustices of slavery at the top of the news for generations, but for many of those who gave their lives it meant their heritage through children and grandchildren would never be achieved, cut short by an American war. It also meant they died at the hands of other Americans. That was and still is hard to reconcile.

We may be watching that reoccur in America today.

And it’s not just ON the streets.

Get In The Faces of Cabinet Members

It’s one thing to peacefully protest. Our nation was built on that tenet of democracy. But when does “peaceful” stop and “confrontation” begin?

We forgot about the riots in Baltimore in which police were physically assaulted, there were multiple injuries of rioters and police. (we show a graphic video of Baltimore violence playing out on city streets in which regular citizens and policemen were assaulted)

It seems that the horrors that play out on the streets are important only when the media need a juicy story. And when the need for those headlines and gory video fade away, so does the reporting. The news is only important when a tragedy with death and destruction and/or police brutality are important for the “appropriate” headline, OR it could simply be turning an otherwise benign White House Oval Office meeting into a weaponized call-to-arms:

That was NBC’s recount of rapper Kanye West meeting with President Trump in the Oval Office. While NBC did not “attack” Kanye, they certainly in this story took jabs at his “40 different topics” NBC reported he brought up while speaking to the President, pointing to the fact a doctor diagnosed Kanye as bi-polar. But media attacks against Americans — like Kanye West — are rampant. And they’re NOT news stories:

CNN pundit Don Lemon used rap star Kanye West’s dead mother to attack him for his political views Thursday, saying that if his mother were still alive, she “would be embarrassed” by his White House visit with President Trump.

Lemon, who has been a constant critic of the President, took umbrage at West’s appearance in the Oval Office as a new music licensing law was signed. “I have no animosity for Kanye West,” Lemon said on CNN. “I’m just going to be honest and I may get in a lot of trouble for it. I actually feel bad for him. What I saw was a minstrel show today. Him in front of all these white people, mostly white people, embarrassing himself and embarrassing Americans, but mostly African-Americans, because every one of them is sitting either at home or with their phones, watching this, cringing.”

“Kanye needs help, this has nothing to do with being liberal or a conservative. We have to stop pretending… like this is normal,” Lemon said.

CNN actually hosted a panel discussion about Kanye’s meeting with the President in which one political pundit called Kanye President Trump’s “token Negro.”

In the African American community, “them’s fightin’ words!” Wait…the pundit who called Kanye Trump’s “token Negro” WAS A BLACK PERSON!

What Is War?

OK: We’ve taken the easy way to open this conversation about War. We need to get to the “nitty-gritty:” What IS War?

Cicero defines war broadly as “a contention by force;” Hugo Grotius adds that “war is the state of contending parties.” Thomas Hobbes notes that war is also an attitude: “By war is meant a state of affairs, which may exist even while its operations are not continued;” Denis Diderot comments that war is “a convulsive and violent disease of the body politic;” for Karl von Clausewitz, “war is the continuation of politics by other means,” and so on. Each definition has its strengths and weaknesses, but often is the culmination of the writer’s broader philosophical positions.

For example, the notion that wars only involve states — as Clausewitz implies — references a strong political theory that assumes politics can only involve states and that war is in some manner or form a reflection of political activity. ‘War’ defined by Webster’s Dictionary is a state of open and declared hostile armed conflict between states or nations, or a period of such conflict. This maintains that war needs to be explicitly declared and to be between states to be a war. Rousseau argues this position: “War is constituted by a relation between things, and not between persons…War then is a relation, not between man and man, but between State and State…” (The Social Contract).

When Does Confrontation Become War?

That’s a good question. And Confrontation does not easily become War. There’s NO easy answer, but answer it we must.

Comparing what we are watching today to other times of conflict on U.S. soil may seem unreasonable to some. After all, we DID have the National Guard gun down rioters at Kent State during the Vietnam conflict. Those were protests that became violent riots. Barack Obama’s mentor William Ayers with his girlfriend Bernadette Dorn of the terrorist group Weather Underground bombed a police station and a policeman was killed. Is it safe for us to allege we’re facing something similar today?

Let’s think that through together:

  • Congressman Steve Scalise (R-LA) was gunned down at a baseball practice of GOP House members in Washington D.C. by a nutjob who was actually there to do just that — kill Republican members of Congress;
  • Rioters in Portland and Berkeley have on several occasions razed businesses, injured private citizens during riots, attacked others, all in the name of Anti-fascism when in fact they are the fascists they say they are fighting!
  • The recent Baltimore riots morphed into violence that resulted in personal injuries for civilians AND police as well as immense damage to personal property.

When will it be appropriate to call what we are seeing “War?”

One might say that watching Leftist politicians instruct their political adherents to “get in the faces of Administration employees and tell them they’re not welcome here,” or to “drive them out of restaurants and gas stations,” or to stand next to their tables in restaurants threatening them is all simply peaceful and legal political demonstrating.

But isn’t all of the above when put in total a type of inciting to riot? “Inciting to riot” is against the law.

Against the Law?

Saying that some of these actions are “against the law” is a joke: we don’t enforce laws — or quite a few of them. Rahm Emanuel — mayor of Chicago — is watching as every weekend dozens of Chicagoans are slaughtered on the streets. That’s been happening for several years. Yet Rahm simply allows it to continue and even restricts Chicago police, preventing them from taking measures that are necessary to stop the killing.

Isn’t that Anarchy?

“Anarchy: Absence of any cohesive principle, such as a common standard or purpose.”

I totally agree with those that say that Chicago is stricken with “the absence of any cohesive principle, such as a common standard or purpose.” A mayor of a city should always keep and maintain a common standard and purpose — if nothing else, to assure the safety of his city’s residents!

Summary

What scares me for my grandchildren is the ever-growing benign acceptance of American leaders of this anarchy, rioting, and terrorization of American citizens that virtually goes unchecked. Maybe they allow it with some hope that it will get so bad it will force Americans to make political changes that those leaders want. Barack Obama himself made it clear he wanted to lead “in the fundamental change of America.” America is fundamentally changing — that’s for certain. But these changes are NOT for the better.

When political leaders stand in front of voters and constituents and instruct those listening to aggressively confront those with whom they hold political differences, are those leaders so blind as to think numbering among all who listen are NOT a few who take those cries literally? Maxine Waters did not only cry with a bullhorn for voters to aggressively confront Trump Administration members on the street, in restaurants, and even in gas stations, she has since doubled and tripled down on her instructions!

Over a year ago on this blog site, I told all who looked in what the difference between Liberals and Conservatives is. I’ll repeat it here for all of you:

“Conservatives don’t like what Liberals stand for. Liberals HATE Conservatives.”

Hatred goes a long way toward inciting anger and violence. Violence goes a long way toward the incitement of terror, bombing, and physical assault. Terror, bombings, and assault are a pre-cursor to War.

I’m not trying to scare everyone here. But on the eve of the midterm elections, we MUST be mindful of who we vote for. Whoever wins these elections will collectively be in positions of leading America into the ratcheting-down of this angry rhetoric that is inciting violence. If we’re not watchful; if we do NOT vote and vote our hearts; if we allow the leaders of these violent Leftists to assume or maintain leadership, we will inevitably slide into a war on American soil.

We are NOT far from that now.

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It’s Coming!

It’s getting pretty crazy in America. We are seeing not just anger and hostility from the Left, we are even closer to the “W” word since the war in Iraq. 

Tomorrow we are revealing evidence of war “in” America. It’s not pretty, it’s not fun to talk about either. But if we don’t talk about it and ignore its signs, when it explodes we’ll be too late to confront and stop it. 

What’s scariest is if it materializes it will be war between Americans. 

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It’s getting serious, Folks.